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Electrical Engineering and Information Technology

Kategorie: ‘Mikro- und Nanoeletronik’

RWTH student team AixSense successful in international SensUs competition

September 15th, 2021 | by

The Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology warmly congratulates students Daniyar Kizatov, Jiayi He, Anshul Prashar and Shunjiro Sodei and all involved on their successful second place in the international Biosensor Competition SensUs! The fourth generation of the RWTH Aachen student team AixSense participated in the SensUs competition at Eindhoven University of Technology this year.

Consisting of four ambitious students from the fields of Computer Engineering and Micro-Nano-Electronics, the interdisciplinary team has spent the past six months developing a prototype biosensor to detect the influenza A virus. Thus, the team worked in the laboratories and clean rooms of our Institute of Materials in Electrical Engineering 1 at RWTH, where the chips (see picture on the right) were produced as key components for the technology. The team was supervised by Prof. Sven Ingebrandt and Dr. Vivek Pachauri.

Daniyar Kizatov, Jiayi He, Anshul Prashar, Shunjiro Sodei | Copyright: IWE1

At the final event, the AixSense team presented the biosensor prototype and was awarded in four categories for analytical performance, creativity, transferability of the concept and public inspiration. In the Analytical Performance category, RWTH Aachen University took second place by a slight margin.

 “Our team was never so close to winning one of the most important awards. It was very close and we are proud of our performance.”

– Daniyar Kizatov, team leader of AixSense

This year, 14 student teams from Denmark, Egypt, the Netherlands, Germany, Portugal, Switzerland, China, Sweden, the USA, Belgium, the UK, Canada and Spain took part in the competition.

The biosensor has been known to the public at the latest since the introduction of the Covid rapid test – but the SensUs community has been supporting young scientists to present their research in the field of biosensors internationally for five years. Every year, a new generation of teams faces the challenge of developing a biosensor prototype for a new disease. So far, the focus has been on detecting biomarkers for kidney failure, heart failure, antibiotic resistance, rheumatism and epilepsy.

Next year, the SensUs competition aims to detect cytokines as crucial proteins in the immune system. The application phase for the next generation of the AixSense team starts in December 2021 – more information on how to apply can be found here.

(Original article press release IWE1)

(Deutsch) 2Exciting Ausbildungsnetzwerk – Die nächste Generation von 2D-Expert*innen fördern

August 23rd, 2021 | by

Sorry, this entry is only available in German.

(Deutsch) Mobilfunkexpertise in Nordrhein-Westfalen – BMBF wählt 6G-Forschungs-Hubs aus

July 6th, 2021 | by

Sorry, this entry is only available in German.

Competence Cluster Battery Utilization Concepts (BattUtilization)

July 4th, 2021 | by

 

Copyright: ISEA

With the further spread of renewable energies and electromobility, powerful and reliable energy storage systems are becoming increasingly important. When is the secondary use of battery storage possible and for which applications is it useful? This question is being addressed by the project partners from research and industry in the new Battery Utilization Concepts ( BattNutzung) cluster, which is being funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research with around 20 million euros. The cluster is coordinated by Prof. Sauer from ISEA. Together with the competence cluster greenBatt, the BattNutzung cluster forms the cross-sectional initiative “Battery Life Cycle”. This aims at a holistic view of second use and recycling concepts, which is to be enabled by linking the two clusters and through a cross-cluster exchange.

Future cluster NeuroSys – Interview with Professor Lemme

April 6th, 2021 | by

The future cluster initiative “Clusters4Future” of the Federal Ministry of Education and Research promotes innovations that go hand in hand with the growing needs of our society. One of the winners of this ideas competition is the cluster “NeuroSys – Neuromorphic Hardware for Autonomous Artificial Intelligence Systems”, which is coordinated by Prof. Dr. -Ing. Max Christian Lemme from the Chair of Electronic Components. The future cluster “NeuroSys” researches adaptive and energy-efficient hardware that is oriented towards the way the brain works. The goal behind this is to allow intelligent and resource-saving on-site data processing and thus create an essential prerequisite for AI applications.

Watch the interview on this page or directly on our YouTube Channel

How catalysts become more active

March 26th, 2021 | by

Researchers from Jülich, Aachen, Stanford, and Berkeley have studied the layer-by-layer structure of catalyst material. They have discovered that a surface layer as thin as a single atom can double the activity for the reaction of water splitting – without increasing the energy consumption. This also doubles the amount of hydrogen produced.
The scientists hope that this increased understanding will allow developing better catalysts in the future to produce green hydrogen more energy-efficiently, and thus more cost-effectively, than before. Hydrogen is called green when it is produced by the electrolysis of water in a climate-neutral way using electricity from renewable sources. Hydrogen is regarded as an essential building block of the energy transition, partly because it can store wind and solar energy in times of oversupply and release it again later.

Part of the research results came about at the Peter Gruenberg Institute, Electronic Materials Division, in the Electronic Oxide Cluster Laboratory of Professor Regina Dittmann.

Original publication: ‘Tuning electrochemically driven surface transformation in atomically flat LaNiO3 thin films for enhanced water electrolysis’
C. Baeumer, J. Li, Q. Lu, A. Liang, L. Jin, H. Martins, T. Duchoň, M. Glöß, S. M. Gericke, M. A. Wohlgemuth, M. Giesen, E. E. Penn, R. Dittmann, F. Gunkel, R. Waser, M. Bajdich, S. Nemšák, J. T. Mefford, W. C. Chueh
Nature Materials, 11 January 2021, DOI: 10.1038/s41563-020-00877-1

 

Find further information on the website of the Jülich Research Centeer

Publication – Contactless, Battery-free, and Stretchable Wearable for Continuous Recording of Seismocardiograms

March 14th, 2021 | by

Photo: IWE1

Prof. Dr.rer.nat. Sven Ingebrandt and his research team published the article “Contactless, Battery-free, and Stretchable Wearable for Continuous Recording of Seismocardiograms” in the journal ACS Applied Electronic Materials.. This article presents a study to enable remote measurement of mechanical cardiac activity using a contactless wearable patch and seismocardiography (SCG). Near-field communication (NFC) technology is used for power supply and wireless recording of SCG data. A separate electrocardiogram (ECG) is used as a reference. The results of this study show a good signal-to-noise ratio and a close correlation between SCG and ECG recordings. This method could become another valuable tool for cardiac monitoring in the future.

 

Contactless, Battery-free, and Stretchable Wearable for Continuous Recording of Seismocardiograms

Milad Eyvazi Hesar, Dibyendu Khan, Niloofar Sadat Seyedsadrkhani, and Sven Ingebrandt
ACS Applied Electronic Materials 2021 3 (1), 11-20

 

2D materials for high-volume production of electronic components

March 12th, 2021 | by

RWTH Professor Max Lemme and research partners publish in Journal “Nature Communications”

Professor Max Lemme, Chair of Electronic Devices at RWTH Aachen University, and his research partners publish a new method to integrate 2D materials into semiconductor manufacturing lines in the journal Nature Communications. The RWTH Aachen University researchers were supported by the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, the University of the Federal Armed Forces in Munich, AMO GmbH and Protemics GmbH. Currently, most experimental methods are not compatible with large-scale production. Moreover, they lead to significant degradation of the 2D material and its electronic properties. The method now being researched attempts to solve these problems. The two-dimensional materials will enable devices with significantly smaller sizes and enhanced functionalities compared to current silicon technologies. Overall, the range of potential applications extends from photonics to sensor technology and neuromorphic computing.

Quellmalz, A. et al. Large-area integration of two-dimensional materials and their heterostructures by wafer bonding. Nature Communications 12, 917 (2021).

 

Further information on the website of AMO GmbH

RWTH and regional partners successful in the “Clusters4Future” ideas competition

February 4th, 2021 | by

Future clusters “NeuroSys” and “Hydrogen” to receive up to 90 million euros in funding from the BMBF

The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) has now published the winners of the “Clusters4Future” ideas competition. The BMBF is funding the research with up to 90 million euros. “Clusters4Future” is part of the German government’s High-Tech Strategy 2025. The open-topic competition focuses on regional innovation networks that combine the strengths of the players, tap into emerging fields of innovation and develop solutions for the challenges of the future.

“NeuroSys – Neuromorphic Hardware for Autonomous Artificial Intelligence Systems”

In addition to RWTH, the Forschungszentrum Jülich, AMO GmbH, IHK Aachen, the companies AixACCT Systems GmbH, AIXTRON SE, AppTek GmbH, ELMOS Semiconductor SE, RWTH Innovation GmbH and STAR Healthcare Management are involved in NeuroSys. In addition, the start-ups AiXscale Photonics UG, Black Semiconductor GmbH, Clinomic GmbH and Gremse-IT GmbH are involved. Professor Max Lemme from the Chair of Electronic Components and Managing Director of AMO GmbH will coordinate the work. The goal is the development of neuromorphic hardware for artificial intelligence applications and thus a technological independence for Germany and Europe. The Federal Ministry of Education and Research is providing up to 45 million euros for this purpose.

In Europe, there are only a few global corporations in the hardware and software sector. Technological independence is of strategic importance, as artificial intelligence will be the building block for the next global stage of development. However, not only future economic growth depends on this key technology, but also the management of major societal challenges such as climate change, health, work or mobility. At the same time, artificial intelligence (AI) brings new challenges. For example, training large neural networks based on modern graphics processing units (GPUs) with deep-learning methods causes high CO2 emissions, which further exacerbate the climate problem. GPU-based neural networks are therefore ecologically unsustainable.

Resource-saving neuromorphic hardware that makes neural networks more efficient and includes data security as a design component is therefore becoming the key to the widespread use of AI. This is especially true for areas of application in autonomous vehicles, medical technology and sensor networks for intelligent production or urban regions. Neuromorphic systems are modelled on the two basic building blocks of the human brain, the neurons and the synapses. By integrating new materials with specific properties, they can ideally perform resource-saving on-site processing of data by integrating new materials with certain properties. This is summarised under the keyword “memristive” – from the English “memory” for storage and “resistor” for electrical resistance.

Scientists at RWTH and Forschungszentrum Jülich have already been able to demonstrate the functionality of neuromorphic devices made of memristive materials. However, there are no pilot lines or production capacities worldwide for manufacturing or integrating neuromorphic chips on an industrial scale. Also, the system of hardware, design, algorithms and application-driven software must work together to exploit the major advantages of neuromorphic hardware. What is needed, therefore, is a paradigm shift with the opportunity to take a leading position in this new technology. NeuroSys wants to develop the decisive prerequisites here.

In addition to economic success, aspects such as the social benefits and ethics of artificial intelligence must be taken into account. These socio-economic framework conditions are essential for new technologies, especially with such a potential reach. They are therefore being researched in NeuroSys, also in order to develop recommendations for action for society and politics.

“The Future Cluster is a great opportunity for the Aachen-Jülich region, especially in connection with the structural change in the Rhenish Revier. We are stepping up to transfer excellent science into companies and start-ups in the region. Our vision is to set up a production line in the Aachen region. There, the co-integration of neuromorphic functions through new materials into conventional silicon technology will then take place” – Professor Lemme.

We also congratulate the Institute for Combustion Engines, since in addition to “NeuroSys”, the seven funded clusters include the future cluster “Hydrogen”, which will also be coordinated by RWTH Aachen University in the coming years. RWTH Aachen University and Forschungszentrum Jülich were applicants for the future cluster “Hydrogen”. So far, 24 institutes of the two research institutions are involved, in addition to 47 industrial partners and 16 other organizations.

Source: Press release of RWTH Aachen University

Neuromorphic Computing

September 18th, 2020 | by

DFG grant for “Memristive Devices Toward Smart Technical Systems”

The German Research Foundation (DFG) is funding five projects under the priority program “Memristive Devices Toward Smart Technical Systems” with the participation of members of the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology at RWTH Aachen University. Four of them are projects at the chair of Prof. Rainer Waser IWE2 and the Peter Grünberg Institute of the Forschungszentrum Jülich. A further project was approved in the teaching and research area of Prof. Regina Dittmann “Technology of Oxide Electronics” also at the Peter Grünberg Institute.

The funding for the five Jülich-Aachen projects amounts to approx. 1.2 million EURO for the duration of the priority program of 3 years. Within the framework of the various projects, Faculty 6 will develop memristive components for use in novel energy-efficient computer structures or for intelligent sensor applications for the future Internet of Things in cooperation with other research institutions such as TU Dresden, TU Chemnitz, the Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT), the Helmholtz-Zentrums Berlin, TU Berlin and the NMI – Natural and Medical Sciences Institute – at the University of Tübingen and the Groningen Cognitive Systems and Materials Center (CogniGron

About the projects:

In the project “Memristive Time difference encoder (MemTDE)” the group of Mrs. Dittmann and the Groningen Cognitive Systems and Materials Center (CogniGron) are working on the development of a memristor-based intelligent electronics for processing sensor signals for the Internet of Things. This is intended to process the collected information on site instead of transmitting it wirelessly using a lot of energy.

In the “Hybrid MEMristor-CMOS Micro Electrode Array bio-sensing platform (MEMMEA)” project, the partners of PGI-7, the Helmholtz Center Berlin, the TU Berlin and the NMI – Natural and Medical Sciences Institute – at the University of Tübingen are striving to develop sensors that can directly record the activity of biological neurons. These sensors based on memristor-CMOS hybrid circuits enable direct on-chip signal processing and open up a new field of biological signal processing.

In the project “Domino Processing Unit: Towards Novel High Efficient In-Memory-Computing (MemDPU)” the partners of PGI-7 and the Chemnitz University of Technology are working on a novel computing unit, the Domino Processing Unit (DPU). In contrast to the conventional von Neumann architecture computing unit, this DPU enables computing directly in memory. With the DPU, the high energy consumption is saved through communication between the memory and the computing unit.

In the project “Universal Memcomputing in Hardware Realizations of Memristor Cellular Nonlinear Networks (Mem2CNN)” the partners of PGI-10, PGI-7 and TU Dresden are pursuing the development of memristive cellular neural networks. These networks enable the direct processing of video signals, for example in the form of edge detection for pattern recognition. Thus, visual data could be processed in real-time.

In the project “Robust Compute-in Memory using Memristors : ROBCOMM”, the partners of IWE 2, PGI-7 and Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) are working on the development of reliable, efficient circuits based on memristive components that enable a Computation-in-Memory (CIM) architecture. The CIM architecture allows to efficiently perform complex computational operations such as vector-matrix operations or to directly solve large systems of equations.